BETA
mildred greear photo
"I learned early how to make a decent biscuit, and from a neighbor that if you have only one egg and five children to feed, you scramble it into gravy. In short, nothing is so small that it cannot be shared, and there are always enough words for poems."


--Mildred Greear
--the author



Biography

Mildred Greear wrote small poems from the earliest years of her life. Her career goals always were to be a teacher and writer. These she achieved after graduating from Jones Junior College and the University of Mississippi and teaching in Gulfport where she met her husband Philip Greear. At the end of World War II, she moved to the Northeast Georgia mountains where she continued teaching, and became a newspaper columnist, celebrating the rural life of children and chicken farming. Her poetry was not widely shared until after her retirement from teaching in the public schools of Floyd County, Georgia. Her first chapbook submission, A Species of Ruin, took first place in the Georgia State Poetry Society contest, and after that, she was published in a variety of regional and international journals. Her second chapbook, At the Edge, was also awarded the Charles B. Dickson honor by the Georgia Poetry Society, and she is the only author to twice receive that award.


She has a deep attachment for the remaining Appalachian ethos of her adopted home in White County, Georgia, and along with her family members is an environmental activist.


Thankful for lessons learned from the exigencies of a Depression-era childhood, Greear is fierce in her love of family, the earth, and its diverse peoples. "I learned early how to make a decent biscuit, and from a neighbor that if you have only one egg and five children to feed, you scramble it into gravy. In short, nothing is so small that it cannot be shared, and there are always enough words for poems."